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Month: October 2015

Mountain Bike: Advices For Buying

Mountain Bike: Advices For Buying

Choosing to buy a mountain bike takes quite lot time and consumes a lot of bikers? People have to take into account all the things they are not sure about, especially for beginners, they seem to consider all, from the bike features to their own demand.

I know that it is not easy to find out a satisfied item but you could consult in some models of the best mountain bikes under 500 in the sponsored sites that you can put your trust in. Today, there are some advice and tips provided to help you to choose.

  1. Prepare enough budget

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Kayak Paddles

Kayak Paddles

Don’t miss the boat. Paddle your way to a great escape that lets you sightsee while you sweat.

Most kayak paddles weigh no more than one and a half to three pounds. I remind myself of this when, 200 yards into my first kayaking lesson on San Francisco Bay, I feel as if someone has set fire to my left deltoid. I glance at my instructor, Duncan Smith, host of the Outdoor Life Network’s REI’s Great Adventures, who wields his paddle as effortlessly as a butter knife.

“Is it normal to be a little fatigued already?”

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A Blue Cotton Flight Suit

A Blue Cotton Flight Suit

A few weeks later, my sister Marda, who lives in Los Angeles, drives me down to El Centro, a desert agricultural community hard on the Mexican border. Eight years younger than I, she wasn’t born when our father disappeared, yet despite–or because of–this, she identifies with him intensely. A few years ago she had a tiny replica of his reconnaissance jet tattooed on her lower abdomen. She tells me it’s been her lifelong dream to fly in a fighter jet, and she’s beside herself with envy. My anxiety only annoys her. “Have fun,” she says, “or I’ll kick your ass.”

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Getting Warmer

Getting Warmer

Since I didn’t get to work out (i.e., rehearse) with Cindy that much (maybe five times in all), I was a little worried about moving in sync with her. But it turned out to be fine; Cindy is a very athletic woman. She can do push-ups as gracefully as she sashays down the runway.

After a couple of hours, we took a lunch break. A catering truck served chicken with rice and grilled shrimp. There was also a salad buffet with the most delicious olives. Savoring them, I recalled how much I craved olives when I was pregnant. Cindy thought that was so healthy of me since she had hankered for Mrs. Field’s chocolate chip cookies. Cindy went for the chicken-with-rice dish, and I had shrimp and way too many olives.

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The Judge Pilot

The Judge Pilot

My pilot, Lt. Keith Hoskins–call sign Judge–settles into the front seat. He has a big smile, a mild Missouri twang, and a running back’s build. He can see me in a rearview mirror, and we can hear each other via two-way mikes. Judge starts the engine and begins his preflight checks. A high-pitched whine arises. The jet’s systems rev; ! sense a steady gathering of energy, of mechanized muscles tensing.

“I’m getting ready to put the canopy down. You all clear?” The lid descends, sealing me in. I reach up to touch it; it feels like glass. Now I am trapped in a high-tech avoid, an unhatched chick. Judge asks me to arm the ejection seat by pushing down a small lever to my left. I do. I try breathing to relax. Inhale deeply from the abdomen. In, out. Again. It’s not working. The plane begins to taxi; the drizzle intensifies. We’re lucky to be flying at all. Nerves make me yawn, blink, swallow. My ears pop. My heart bangs against its cage. Control-tower babble fills my headset.

“How are you doing back there?” Judge asks.

“Pretty good.” Pause. “So we’re going to go straight up?” Primeau had warned me about the HPC, or high-performance climb.

“I’m going to accelerate up to 300 mph and pull back on the stick,” Judge explains. “The nose of the aircraft is going to pitch up very rapidly, and we’re going to do a 45-degree nose up climb. We’re going to pull about five Gs during this maneuver.”

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